Upcoming Seminars & Events

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February 2, 2017
10:45am - 11:45am
TBA - Sara Tukachinsky
Speaker: Sara Tukachinsky , Montreal
Location:
IAS Room S-101
February 6, 2017
3:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA - Marianna Csörnyei
Speaker: Marianna Csörnyei , University of Chicago
Location:
Fine Hall 314
February 8, 2017
2:30pm - 3:30pm
TBA - John Wright
Speaker: John Wright, Columbia University
Location:
Fine Hall 224
February 8, 2017
3:00pm - 4:00pm
Random walk on free solvable groups

The study of free solvable groups has been advocated and pursued by Anatoly Vershik and others with various perspectives in mind. I will discuss random walks on free finitely generated solvable groups in the general context of geometric group theory and with an emphasize on exploring what algebraic properties are reflected in the behavior of various random walk. (Joint work with Tianyi Zheng)

Speaker: Laurent Saloff-Coste, Cornell University
Location:
Fine Hall 214
February 8, 2017
4:30pm - 5:30pm
TBA - Roman Travkin
Speaker: Roman Travkin , IAS
Location:
Fine Hall 314
February 9, 2017
10:45am - 11:45am
TBA - Yakov Savelyev
Speaker: Yakov Savelyev , University of Colima, Mexico
Location:
IAS Room S-101
February 9, 2017
3:00pm - 4:00pm
TBA - Eli Berger
Speaker: Eli Berger , Haifa University
Location:
Fine Hall 224
February 9, 2017
3:00pm - 4:00pm
TBA - Mahmoud Zeinalian
Speaker: Mahmoud Zeinalian, CUNY
Location:
Fine Hall 322
February 9, 2017
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Heegaard Floer invariants for homology S^1 \times S^3s

Using Heegaard Floer homology, we construct a numerical invariant for any smooth, oriented 4-manifold X with the homology of S^1 \times S^3. Specifically, we show that for any smoothly embedded 3-manifold Y representing a generator of H_3(X), a suitable version of the Heegaard Floer d invariant of Y, defined using twisted coefficients, is a diffeomorphism invariant of X. We show how this invariant can be used to obstruct embeddings of certain types of 3-manifolds, including those obtained as a connected sum of a rational homology 3-sphere and any number of copies of S^1 \times S^2. We also give similar obstructions to embeddings in certain open 4-manifolds, including exotic R^4s. This is joint work with Danny Ruberman.

Speaker: Adam Levine, Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 314
February 13, 2017
3:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA - Yannick Sire
Speaker: Yannick Sire , Johns Hopkins University
Location:
Fine Hall 314
February 13, 2017
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Survival and Schooling Hydrodynamics

The aqueous environment of natural swimmers mediates magnificent patterns of schooling as well as their escape and attack routines. We study the fluid mechanics of single and multiple swimmers through simulations that rely on state of the art multi-resolution vortex methods. Stochastic optimisation and  machine learning algorithms are used to find optimal shapes and motions for single and synchronised patterns for multiple swimmers. I will discuss how the orchestration of body deformations and vortex dynamics can result in thrust and energy savings for these artificial swimmers and juxtapose these findings with swimming patterns of natural organisms. Lessons learned can assist the design and operation of energy efficient swimming devices.

Speaker: Petros Koumoutsakos, ETH Zürich
Location:
Fine Hall 214
February 14, 2017
4:30pm - 5:30pm
TBA - Kuan-Wen Lai
Speaker: Kuan-Wen Lai , Brown University
Location:
Fine Hall 322
February 15, 2017
2:30pm - 3:30pm
TBA - Sergey Voronin
Speaker: Sergey Voronin, University of Colorado Boulder
Location:
Fine Hall 224
February 15, 2017
3:00pm - 4:00pm
A Feynman-Kac formula for differential forms on manifolds with boundary and applications

We prove a Feynman-Kac-type formula for the heat flow acting on differential forms satisfying absolute boundary conditions on Riemannian manifolds with boundary and of bounded geometry. We use this to construct L^2 harmonic forms out of bounded ones on the universal cover of a compact Riemannian manifold whose geometry displays a positivity property expressed in terms of a certain stochastic average of the Weitzenbock operator acting on forms and the second fundamental form of the boundary. As a geometric application we find a new obstruction to the existence of metrics with positive isotropic curvature and 2-convex boundary.We also present a version of the Feynman-Kac formula for spinors under suitable boundary conditions and discuss potential applications. 

Speaker: Levi Lopes de Lima, Universidade Federal Do Ceará
Location:
Fine Hall 314
February 15, 2017
4:30pm - 5:30pm
TBA - Richard Schoen
Speaker: Richard Schoen , UC Irvine
Location:
Fine Hall 314
February 16, 2017
3:00pm - 4:00pm
TBD - Byungdo Park
Speaker: Byungdo Park, CUNY, Graduate Center
Location:
Fine Hall 322
February 20, 2017
3:00pm - 4:30pm
TBA - Hao Jia
Speaker: Hao Jia , IAS
Location:
Fine Hall 314
February 20, 2017
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Equiangular lines and spherical codes in Euclidean spaces

A family of lines through the origin in Euclidean space is called equiangular if any pair of lines defines the same angle. The problem of estimating the maximum cardinality of such a family in $\mathbb{R}^n$ was extensively studied for the last 70 years. Answering a question of Lemmens and Seidel from 1973, in this talk we show that for every fixed angle $\theta$ and sufficiently large $n$ there are at most $2n-2$ lines in $\mathbb{R}^n$ with common angle $\theta$. Moreover, this is achievable only when $\theta =\arccos\frac{1}{3}$. Various extensions of this result to the more general settings of lines with $k$ fixed angles and of spherical codes will be discussed as well.  Joint work with I. Balla, F. Drexler and P. Keevash.

Speaker: Benny Sudakov, ETH Zürich
Location:
Fine Hall 214
February 21, 2017
2:00pm - 3:00pm
TBA - Kenneth Ascher

Please note special time and location.  

Speaker: Kenneth Ascher , Brown University
Location:
Fine Hall 401
February 21, 2017
5:00pm - 6:00pm
Episodes from Quantitative Topology: 1. Variational problems, Morse and Turing.

This lecture will begin the series of discussing how effective solutions of topological problems are: and in particular, how large solutions to geometric topological problems are with various measures of complexity.  Lecture one will show how one can use basic results about computability, algorithmic undecidability, and more general complexity measures to prove the existence of many solutions to certain variational problems.  (This is largely based on joint work with Alex Nabutovsky.)

Speaker: Shmuel Weinberger , University of Chicago
Location:
TBD

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