PACM/Applied Mathematics Colloquium

The PACM Colloquium hosts seminars in the field of applied mathematics. Domains of interest include computational fluid dynamics and material science, dynamical systems, numerical analysis and fast algorithms, stochastic problems and stochastic analysis, graph theory and applications, mathematical biology, financial mathematics and mathematical approaches to signal analysis, image processing and information theory.

http://www.pacm.princeton.edu/seminars

Organizer(s): 

For more information about this seminar, contact Amit Singer

Please click on colloquium title for complete abstract.

February 27, 2017
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Sampling Nodes and Constructing Expanders Locally

In many real world applications we have only limited access to networks. For example when we crawl a social network or we design a peer-to-peer system we are restricted to access nodes only locally.

Location
Fine Hall 214
Speaker: Silvia Lattanzi,
Google Research
March 6, 2017
4:00pm - 5:00pm
How Far Are We From Having a Satisfactory Theory of Clustering?

Unsupervised learning is widely recognized as one of the most important challenges facing machine learning nowadays. However, unlike supervised learning, our current theoretical understanding of those tasks, and in particular of clustering, is very rudimentary.

Location
Fine Hall 214
Speaker: Shai Ben-David,
University of Waterloo
March 13, 2017
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Recent progress in object recognition and symmetry detection in digital images

I will survey developments in the application of invariants of various types, including differential invariant signatures and joint invariant histograms, for object recognition and symmetry detection in digital images.  Recent applications, including automated jigsaw puzzle assembly and cancer de

Location
Fine Hall 214
Speaker: Peter Olver,
University of Minnesota
March 27, 2017
4:00pm - 5:00pm
TBA - Gregory Chikikjian
Location
Fine Hall 214
Speaker: Gregory Chikikjian,
Johns Hopkins University
April 10, 2017
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Physics in the complex plane

The average quantum physicist on the street would say that a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian must be Dirac Hermitian (invariant under combined matrix transposition and complex conjugation) in order to guarantee that the energy eigenvalues are real and that time evolution is unitary.

Location
Fine Hall 214
Speaker: Carl M. Bender,
Washington University in St. Louis