Seminars & Events for 2016-2017

November 21, 2016
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Kernel-based methods for Bandit Convex Optimization

Please click on the following link to access the abstract for this talk:  http://www.pacm.princeton.edu/pacm-colloquium

Speaker: Ronen Eldan, Weizmann Institute of Science
Location:
Fine Hall 214
November 28, 2016
3:00pm - 4:30pm
Strong cosmic censorship in spherical symmetry for two-ended asymptotically flat data

In this talk, I will present a recent work (joint with Jonathan Luk) on the strong cosmic censorship conjecture for the Einstein-Maxwell-(real)-scalar-field system in spherical symmetry for two-ended asymptotically flat data. For this model, it was previously proved (by M. Dafermos and I.

Speaker: Sung-Jin Oh , KIAS
Location:
Fine Hall 314
November 28, 2016
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Concurrent Disjoint Set Union

The disjoint set union problem is a classical problem in data structures with a simple and efficient sequential solution that has a notoriously complicated analysis.  One application is to find strongly connected components in huge, implicitly defined graphs arising in model checking.  In this application, the use of multiprocessors has the potential to produce significant speedups.  We explore

Speaker: Robert Tarjan, Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 214
November 29, 2016
1:30pm - 2:30pm
Rectification and the Floer complex: Quantizing Lagrangians in T^N

 We shall give a construction of the quantized sheaf of a Lagrangian submanifold in T^N and explain a number of features and applications.

 

Speaker: Claude Viterbo , ENS, Paris
Location:
IAS Room S-101
November 29, 2016
3:00pm - 4:00pm
C^0 Hamiltonian dynamics and a counterexample to the Arnold conjecture

After introducing Hamiltonian homeomorphisms and recalling some of their properties, I will focus on fixed point theory for this class of homeomorphisms. The main goal of this talk is to present the outlines of a C^0 counterexample to the Arnold conjecture in dimensions four and higher. This is joint work with Lev Buhovsky and Vincent Humiliere.

 

Speaker: Sobhan Seyfaddini , MIT
Location:
IAS Room S-101
November 29, 2016
3:00pm - 4:30pm
On a problem of Kahane in higher dimensions

Please note special day, time and room.   We characterise those real analytic mappings from T^k to T^d which map absolutely convergent Fourier series on T^d to uniformly convergent Fourier series via composition.

Speaker: Jim Wright , University of Edinburgh
Location:
Fine Hall 322
November 30, 2016
1:30pm - 2:30pm
Nonlinear Fourier series via Blaschke products

Please note different start time: 1:30.    Classical Fourier series may be interpreted as repeatedly adding and removing roots in the origin of the complex plane.

Speaker: Stefan Steinerberger, Yale University
Location:
Fine Hall 224
November 30, 2016
3:00pm - 4:00pm
Finding and hiding the seed

I will present an overview of recent developments in source detection and estimation in randomly growing graphs and diffusions on graphs. Can one detect the influence of the initial seed graph? How good are root-finding algorithms? Can one engineer messaging protocols that hide the source of a rumor? I will explore such questions in the talk.

Speaker: Miklos Racz , Microsoft
Location:
Fine Hall 214
November 30, 2016
3:00pm - 4:00pm
Proof of a Null Penrose Conjecture using a new Quasi-local Mass

We define an explicit quasi-local mass functional which is nondecreasing along all null foliations (satisfying a convexity assumption) of null cones. We use this new functional to prove the Null Penrose Conjecture under fairly generic conditions.

Speaker: Henri Roesch, Duke University
Location:
Fine Hall 314
November 30, 2016
4:30pm - 5:30pm
TBD - Paul Seidel
Speaker: Paul Seidel , MIT/IAS
Location:
Fine Hall 314
December 1, 2016
12:30pm - 1:30pm
The Modularity Theorem

The Shimura–Taniyama–Weil conjecture, now known as the modularity theorem, states that all elliptic curves over the field of rational numbers are modular. In this talk we will not attempt to discuss the proof; instead, we will have a more modest goal — to understand the statement, i.e., what it means for an elliptic curve to be modular.

Speaker: Boya Wen , Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 110
December 1, 2016
2:00pm - 3:30pm
A Central Limit Theorem for a $\B$-free dynamical system

For a set $\mathcal{B} \subset \mathbb{N} \setminus \{1\}$, let $\mathcal{B}$-free integers be the set of integers that are not divisible by any element of $\mathcal{B}$ and let $X^{\mathcal{B}} \subset \{0,1\}^{\mathbb{Z}}$ be the closure of the orbit of the indicator of $\mathcal{B}$--free integers under the left shift $T$.  One can equip $\left(X^{\mathcal{B}},T\right)$ with the $T$--invaria

Speaker: Maria Avdeeva , Queen's University
Location:
Jadwin Hall 111
December 1, 2016
3:00pm - 4:30pm
Capsets, sunflower-free sets in {0,1}^n, and the slice rank method

We call a family of sets F "sunflower-free'' if for every three of its sets, some element belongs to exactly two of them.

Speaker: Eric Naslund , Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 224
December 1, 2016
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Cobordism maps in link Floer homology

Given a (decorated) link cobordism between two links K and L (that is, an embedded surface in S^3 x [0,1] that K and L co-bound), Juhász defined a map between their link Floer homologies. We prove that when the surface is an annulus the map preserves the natural bigrading of HFL and is always non-zero.

Speaker: Marco Marengon , Imperial College London
Location:
Fine Hall 314
December 1, 2016
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Transport and mixing by viscous vortex rings

Biomixing is the study of fluid mixing caused by swimming organisms.  The swimming of large organisms can lead to mixing by the turbulent flows in their wakes, but the wakes created by small swimming organisms are less turbulent.  Instead, the main mechanism of mixing by smaller organisms is the net particle displacement (drift) induced by the swimmer.  Several experiments have been performed t

Speaker: Jean-Luc Thiffeault , UW-Madison
Location:
Fine Hall 322
December 1, 2016
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Integral points on moduli schemes and Thue equations

We will explain a way how one can use moduli schemes and their natural forgetful maps in the study of certain classical Diophantine problems (e.g. finding all integral points on hyperbolic curves). To illustrate and motivate the strategy, we consider the case of cubic Thue equations and we discuss a joint project with Matschke in which we solved many cubic Thue equations.

Speaker: Rafael von Känel, Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 214
December 5, 2016
3:00pm - 4:30pm
CANCELLED: The Kakeya needle problem for rectifiable sets

THIS SEMINAR HAS BEEN CANCELLED.  We show that the classical results about rotating a line segment in arbitrarily small area, and the existence of a Besicovitch and a Nikodym set hold if we replace the line segment by an arbitrary rectifiable set. This is a joint work with Alan Chang. 

Speaker: Marianna Csörnyei , University of Chicago
Location:
Fine Hall 314
December 5, 2016
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Turbulent weak solutions of the Euler equations

This joint Math/PACM colloquium will be held at 4:00, Monday, December 5, in Fine 214.

Speaker: Vlad Vicol, Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 214
December 5, 2016
4:00pm - 5:00pm
Turbulent weak solutions of the Euler equations

This joint Math/PACM colloquium will be held at 4:00, Monday, December 5, in Fine 214.

Speaker: Vlad Vicol, Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 214
December 6, 2016
3:00pm - 4:00pm
Contact manifolds with flexible fillings

In this talk, I will prove that all flexible Weinstein fillings of a given contact manifold have isomorphic integral cohomology. As an application, I will show that in dimension at least 5 any almost contact class that has an almost Weinstein filling has infinitely many different contact structures.

Speaker: Oleg Lazarev , Stanford University
Location:
Fine Hall 224

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