Seminars & Events for 2014-2015

November 20, 2014
4:30pm - 6:00pm
Propagation enhancement of reaction-diffusion fronts by a line of fast diffusion

We discuss here a new model to describe biological invasions in the plane when a strong diffusion takes place on a line. By 'strong diffusion', we mean a large multiple of the Laplacian, or the fractional laplacian. The question is the asymptotic (as time goes to infinity) speed of spreading in the direction of the line and in the plane.

Speaker: Jean-Michel Roquejoffre, University of Toulouse
Location:
Fine Hall 322
November 20, 2014
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Weyl-type hybrid subconvexity bounds for twisted L-functions and Heegner points on shrinking sets

One of the major themes of the analytic theory of automorphic forms is the connection between equidistribution and subconvexity. An early example of this is the famous result of Duke showing the equidistribution of Heegner points on the modular surface, a problem that boils down to the subconvexity problem for the quadratic twists of Hecke-Maass L-functions.

Speaker: Matt Young , Texas A&M
Location:
IAS Room S-101
November 20, 2014
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Taut foliations, left-orderability, and cyclic branched covers
Speaker: Cameron Gordon, University of Texas at Austin
Location:
Fine Hall 314
November 21, 2014
1:30pm - 2:30pm
Cyclic homology and S^1-equivariant symplectic cohomology

In this talk, we study two natural circle actions in Floer theory, one on symplectic cohomology and one on the Hochschild homology of the Fukaya category. We show that the geometric open-closed string map between these two complexes is S^1-equivariant, at a suitable chain level.

Speaker: Sheel Ganatra, Stanford University
Location:
Fine Hall 322
November 21, 2014
3:00pm - 4:00pm
Quantitative uniqueness, doubling lemma and nodal sets

Based on a variant of frequency function, we improve the vanishing order of solutions for Schr\"{o}dinger equations which describes quantitative behavior of strong uniqueness continuation property.

Speaker: Jiuyi Zhu, Johns Hopkins
Location:
Fine Hall 314
November 24, 2014
3:15pm - 4:30pm
TBA - Hintz
Speaker: Peter Hintz , Stanford University
Location:
Fine Hall 314
November 24, 2014
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Eigenvector Centralities for Temporal Networks

Motivated by a series of examples (the U.S. Ph.D. exchange in mathematics, co-starring relationships among top-billed actors in Hollywood, and co-citations between U.S. Supreme Court decisions), we study the general problem of calculating eigenvector centralities as generalized to temporal directed network data.

Speaker: Peter Mucha , University of North Carolina
Location:
Fine Hall 214
November 25, 2014
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Interface dynamics for incompressible flows

The goal of these lectures is to present the main ideas and arguments of recent results concerning global solutions and finite time singularities for interface dynamics. In particular those contour dynamics that are given by basic fluid mechanics systems; Euler´s equation, Darcy´s law and the Quasi-geostrophic equation.

Speaker: Diego Cordoba Gazolaz, Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 110
December 1, 2014
4:30pm - 5:30pm
When Exactly Do Quantum Computers Provide a Speedup?

Twenty years after the discovery of Shor's factoring algorithm, I'll survey what we now understand about the structure of problems that admit quantum speedups.  I'll start with the basics, discussing the hidden subgroup, amplitude amplification, adiabatic, and linear systems paradigms for quantum algorithms.  Then I'll move on to some general results, obtained by Andris Ambainis and myself over

Speaker: Scott Aaronson , MIT
Location:
Fine Hall 214
December 2, 2014
2:00pm - 3:00pm
TBA - Nori
Speaker: Mahdav Nori , University of Chicago
Location:
IAS Room S-101
December 2, 2014
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Interface dynamics for incompressible flows

The goal of these lectures is to present the main ideas and arguments of recent results concerning global solutions and finite time singularities for interface dynamics. In particular those contour dynamics that are given by basic fluid mechanics systems; Euler´s equation, Darcy´s law and the Quasi-geostrophic equation.

Speaker: Diego Cordoba Gazolaz, Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 110
December 3, 2014
11:00am - 12:30pm
TBA - McLean

Please note special day.

Speaker: Mark McLean , Stony Brook University
Location:
IAS Room S-101
December 3, 2014
2:00pm - 3:00pm
Central Limit Theorems and Lee-Yang Zeros

I will describe some old and some new results (joint work with Pittel, Ruelle, Speer) on how to derive Central Limit Theorems and even Local Central Limit Theorems from information about the location of zeros of the generating function. Applications to the distribution of eigenvalues of random matrices, graph counting polynomials, and statistical mechanical systems will be given.

Speaker: Joel Lebowitz , Rutgers University
Location:
Fine Hall 322
December 3, 2014
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Automorphic L-functions and descent method

Automorphic L-functions are fundamental invariants attached to a given cuspidal automorphic representation of a reductive group G. In addition to arithmetic applications, automorphic L-functions are used to characterize various types of Langlands functorial transfers.

Speaker: Dihua Jiang, University of Minnesota
Location:
Fine Hall 314
December 4, 2014
12:30pm - 1:30pm
Rationality of Algebraic Varieties

Finding a rational parametrization for a system of polynomial equations has been studied for a long time, and it leads to the concept of rational varieties. Bézout’s theorem implies that degree 1 and 2 hypersurfaces are rational. It is a hard problem to determine whether a general variety is rational.

Speaker: Yuchen Liu , Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 314
December 4, 2014
2:00pm - 3:30pm
Unbounded orbits for the cubic nonlinear Schrodinger equation in the semi periodic setting

A natural question in the study of nonlinear dispersive equations is to describe their asymptotic behavior. In the Euclidean plane, in great generality, global solutions scatter (i.e. asymptotically follow a linear flow).

Speaker: Benoit Pausader , Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 601
December 4, 2014
3:00pm - 4:00pm
The Persistent Homology Group

The persistence of a function f: X -> R is a collection of measurements, one for each open interval of the real line.  We call each measurement a persistent homology group.  If f is stratifiable, then its persistence can be visualized by something called the persistence diagram.  The persistent homology group is special because it is stable to perturbations of the function f.  Through the le

Speaker: Amit Patel, IAS
Location:
Fine Hall 314
December 4, 2014
3:00pm - 4:00pm
On the number of rich lines in truly high dimensional sets

We prove a new upper bound on the number of r-rich lines (lines with at least r points) in a `truly' d-dimensional configuration of points v_1,...,v_n over the complex numbers. More formally, we show that, if the number of r-rich lines is significantly larger than n^2/r^d then there must exist a large subset of the points  contained in a hyperplane.

Speaker: Zeev Dvir, Princeton University
Location:
Fine Hall 224
December 4, 2014
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Heegaard Floer homologies and cuspidal curves
Speaker: Maciej Borodzik, University of Warsaw
Location:
Fine Hall 314
December 4, 2014
4:30pm - 5:30pm
Level raising mod 2 and arbitrary 2-Selmer ranks

We prove a level raising mod p=2 theorem for elliptic curves over Q, generalizing theorems of Ribet and Diamond-Taylor. As an application, we show that the 2-Selmer rank can be arbitrary in level raising families. We will begin by explaining our motivation from W. Zhang's approach to the p-part of the BSD conjecture.

Speaker: Chao Li , Harvard University
Location:
IAS Room S-101

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